Faculty News

In the News | Ford School News | Faculty News | Student News | Alumni News

61–80 of 816

« Previous 1 2 3 4 5 640 41 Next »

Wolfers to contribute to New York Times politics and policy website The Upshot

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Professor of Public Policy Justin Wolfers will be a regular contributor to the New York Times venture The Upshot, which launched on April 22. Per the New York Times release, "the goal of [The Upshot] is to help readers better navigate the news using data, graphics and technology."

[More]


Collaborative research effort shows pollution top concern for citizens around Great Lakes

Monday, April 21, 2014

The Ford School joined a research team including faculty and graduate students from Ryerson University in Toronto and Muhlenberg College in Pennsylvania to survey public opinion on issues related to the Great Lakes basin.

[More]


Ford School's Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy hosts Ann Arbor mayoral candidates

Friday, April 18, 2014

The Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP) hosted the four declared candidates in Ann Arbor's mayoral race on Wednesday, April 16. The forum focused on the future of public transportation and prospects for economic development of Ann Arbor's downtown. Mayor John Hieftje, who is stepping down after 14 years in office and is a longtime lecturer at the Ford School, moderated the event.

[More]


CLOSUP illuminates local leaders' perceptions of tax-exempt properties

Thursday, April 10, 2014

"It's no overstatement to say that property tax revenues are really the lifeblood of local government. So what do local leaders think about the tax-exempt properties within their borders—the ones that take up municipal services, but are exempt from paying taxes?" asks Cynthia Canty of "Stateside," the Michigan Radio program, during a recent interview with Tom Ivacko (MPA '93), administrator and program manager of CLOSUP.

[More]


Waltz argues Universal Declaration of Human Rights a global, cooperative effort; not just a western idea

Thursday, April 10, 2014

On April 9th, Professor of Public Policy Susan E. Waltz, a scholar and long-time leader in the field of human rights, describes "How Human Rights Went Global" in openSecurity. Waltz says the Universal Declaration of Human Rights isn't a document of western values imposed on the world, an argument used by many human rights abusers to discard the letter and intent of the Declaration. Rather, it "emerged from the wisdom of the post-war international crowd," a true reflection of international beliefs codified in international law.

[More]


Public less supportive of state fossil fuel taxes, says CLOSUP, still strong for renewable electricity

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

CLOSUP's March report from the National Surveys on Energy and the Environment reveals declining support for state fossil fuel taxes levied to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

[More]


Maya Menlo plays a role in U-M decision to support Bangladesh factory safety accord

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

"President Mary Sue Coleman announced April 1 that U-M will adopt the recommendations of the President's Advisory Committee on Labor Standards and Human Rights that all U-M licensees either sign and abide by a worker safety initiative called the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh or demonstrate that they have an equivalent safety plan," reports Kim Broekhuizen in the April 7 edition of The University Record.

[More]


Harvard Political Review article quotes Mary Corcoran on gender inequality in the academy

Friday, April 4, 2014

In the Harvard Political Review article, "Leaks in the Pipeline: Gender Equity in the Academy," Kaitlyn Jeong quotes Professor Mary Corcoran on gender inequality in academia.

[More]


Debate over 'Pay It Forward' continues, Dynarski's suggested amendments receive increased attention

Friday, April 4, 2014

Susan Dynarski is quoted in a number of articles this month discussing 'Pay It Forward' legislation, now under consideration by more than a dozen states, which would tie student loan repayments to a percentage of income for a fixed number of years. The model, explains Dynarski in her February Brookings blog, is a disincentive to those who expect to make a higher income post-graduation. Why? Because they'll wind up paying more and subsidizing low earners.

[More]


Times of India highlights Yang study, motivating migrants boosts savings

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Ruchi Chopda of the Times of India reports on a recent discovery by Dean Yang and Ganesh Seshan: motivating migrants can help them save more, do it more collaboratively, and send more money to their families back home.

[More]


GM penny-wise and pound-foolish says Marina v.N. Whitman

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

In an interview with reporters, Marina v.N. Whitman, once the highest ranking female executive in the auto industry and a former vice president and group executive at General Motors, discusses the company's lengthy delay in recalling cars with faulty ignition switches that have been blamed for at least 13 deaths.

[More]


Hausman's Brookings Institution paper analyzes Japan's new economic policy – "Abenomics"

Thursday, March 20, 2014

A recent Brookings paper published by the Ford School's Joshua K. Hausman and University of California, San Diego's Johannes Wieland analyzes Japan's new economic policy experiment – "Abenomics." Hausman and Wieland claim that if Japanese policymakers are able to convince the public, the policy has the potential to boost the economy.

[More]


The Center for Public Policy in Diverse Societies hosts calls for proposals

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

The Center for Public Policy in Diverse Societies will give out funding for up to five project proposals. The Center is seeking proposals that "contribute to interdisciplinary and collaborative research on issues related to diversity in public policy or enrich the broader community's engagement with issues of diversity." The Center's vision aims "to create an intellectual environment that will foster dialogue and debate and lead to concrete policy solutions which address the opportunities and challenges of diversity."

[More]


Five Ford School faculty were nominated by students for this year's Golden Apple Award

Friday, March 14, 2014

The Golden Apple Award, recognizes outstanding university teaching, and is the only award where nominees are chosen by students. This year, about 300 faculty in total were chosen, and out of this five were from the Ford School. This year's winner for the Golden Apple Award is Victor Lieberman, a Raoul Wallenberg Distinguished Professor of History and Asian and Comparative History. The award ceremony will take place on April 2, 2014 in Rackham Auditorium.

[More]


Levitsky shares his view on Russia-Ukraine with U.S. News and World Report

Friday, March 7, 2014

On March 7, Ambassador Melvyn Levitsky was quoted in a U.S. News and World Report article on the emerging crisis between Russia, Ukraine, and the West. During his tenure as ambassador, Levitsky held posts as officer-in-charge of U.S.-Soviet relations and political officer at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

[More]


Times of India reports on Dean Yang's new study: short financial literacy seminar improves migrant saving decisions

Friday, March 7, 2014

"More than 200 million workers travel abroad to work as maids, construction labourers and at other low-wage jobs," writes Hemali Chhapia for the Times of India. "The money they send back home is often essential to their families' survival and homeland's economy."

[More]


Electronic cigarette liquid is extracted from tobacco; let's regulate them as we'd regulate other tobacco products says Michigan's chief medical executive

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Dr. Matthew Davis, a Ford School faculty member and chief medical executive for the state of Michigan, calls on legislators to regulate e-cigarettes just as they regulate tobacco products.

[More]


Curtiss Lusher wins Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Ben Curtiss Lusher, a dual-master's candidate in business administration and public policy, has been recognized by the Rackham Graduate School with the Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) Award.

[More]


Short seminar on financial decision-making yields impressive results for migrants who don't save

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Dean Yang, speaking in a Ford School Policy Points video, shares results from a recent microfinance study of the impact of modest financial literacy training on migrants' decisions to save. Yang and colleagues conducted a microsavings study of Indian migrants in the Arab Emirate of Qatar to find out how they made spending and saving decisions before the start of the study, and how their behavior changes in response to a three-hour motivational seminar on financial decision-making.

[More]


Potter comments on the large-scale knife attack at a train station in Southern China

Saturday, March 1, 2014

In a LA Times article on the March 1 attack, Philip Potter states that, although knives are low-tech, the attack showed sophistication because of the significant coordination and power projection. The attack occurred in Kumming, the capital of Yunnan province, when a group of assailants wielding large knives stormed into a railway station and attacked people at random.

[More]


61–80 of 816

« Previous 1 2 3 4 5 640 41 Next »


News RSS