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Murphy seeks to put a face on new suburban poverty

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

In an article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Alexandra Murphy, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Ford School's National Poverty Center, comments on the invisibility of and unique challenges facing the suburban poor. In 2009, Murphy moved to Penn Hills, a suburb of Pittsburgh, in order to research and put a face on new suburban poverty.

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Whitman quoted in article on gender disparity in college economic departments

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

In a Wall Street Journal article on the persistent gap between men and women at all levels of academic economics, Marina v.N. Whitman commented on the increased competition for tenure and pressure to publish faced by young academics. The article highlights that, while female economists have a rising profile in prestigious positions and institutions, women make up a considerably smaller percentage of economics PhD's, undergraduate majors, and professors. For example, in 2012, women constituted just 11.6% of full tenured professors.

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Davis quoted on health impacts and growing appeal of e-cigarettes

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

In a story for Michigan Radio, Dr. Matthew Davis explains that no studies have been done on the long-term health impacts of e-cigarettes, which are unregulated and increasingly popular with teens.

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States and localities need to work together to tap the potential of shale deposits, writes Rabe

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

In a blog post for the Brookings Institution, Barry Rabe and Christopher Borick, a professor of political science at Muhlenberg College, explain how a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision highlights the state and local governance challenges facing regions with accessible shale deposits. The Court voted to sustain a lower court decision to overturn key provisions in 2012 legislation that put fracking largely under state control. The case was brought by a series of local governments.

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Legacies of the war on poverty, lessons for the future

Friday, December 20, 2013

January 8, 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson's declaration of "unconditional War on Poverty." Yet 15 percent of Americans live in poverty today, and no presidential administration or Congress since the Johnson era has made fighting poverty a top priority.

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Catalysts for change-themed Fall edition of State & Hill published

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

On critically important policy issues, members of the Ford School community have catalyzed real and lasting change—enriching understanding, building consensus, and mobilizing action. This edition of State & Hill features stories about the extended reach and impact of faculty, alumni and friends of the Ford School.

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A powerful public service

Monday, December 16, 2013

Scholarly CVs are long, there's no denying it, so it's not surprising that Paul N. Courant's CV stretches a good twelve feet from end to end. What is surprising is that what is likely to be Courant's single greatest contribution to scholarship isn't mentioned in his CV at all: development of the largest digital library in the world, the HathiTrust.

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Not your typical physician - Dr. Matt Davis uses policy to tackle health disparities

Monday, December 16, 2013

Dr. Matthew Davis is not your typical physician. Sure, he attended medical school and completed a residency, just like his peers. But while continuing his studies as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Chicago, Davis also earned a master's degree in public policy. Davis still sees and serves primary care patients through his practice with the University of Michigan Health System, but his public policy training, and what he's done with it over the years, is allowing him to serve the health needs of much larger communities, in much broader ways. These days, he's doing that as chief medical executive for the state of Michigan—a role he took on in March of this year.

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Whitman praises "pioneering" selection of Mary Barra as General Motors CEO

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

In an interview with Business Insider, Marina v.N. Whitman explains why choosing Mary Barra as the first female chief executive of a major auto company was a brilliant move by General Motors. Whitman was vice president and group executive of Public Affairs for GM in the 1980s, at that time the highest-ranking female in the traditionally male-dominated industry. She notes that the choice of Barra shows that GM "is pioneering again" and gives women "a goal to strive for."

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Give the people a centrist party, says Whitman

Monday, December 9, 2013

Marina v.N. Whitman, professor at the Ford School and the Ross School of Business, likes to say that she didn't leave the Republican Party, it left her. She and a vast number of her fellow Americans want a more centrist political party. So what about a Moderate Majority party?

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Stevenson quoted in Detroit Free Press article on impact if emergency unemployment benefits are not extended

Thursday, December 5, 2013

An article in the Detroit Free Press outlines the impact for Michigan if federal emergency unemployment benefits are not extended. The program is set to expire on December 28th unless Congress takes action. House and Senate Democrats have proposed a one-year, $25 billion extension. In the article, Betsey Stevenson, a Ford School professor and member of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, notes that the long-time unemployment rate is 2.6 percent, which is more than double "any other time that we have allowed benefits" to end.



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Jacob receives Walton Family Foundation grant to study online learning

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Brian Jacob, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy and co-director of the Education Policy Initiative, has received a $200,000 grant from the Walton Family Foundation to study the effectiveness of online learning in the K-12 sector.

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Wolfers hired for New York Times data driven website

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Justin Wolfers will be brought on as a contributing columnist for an upcoming New York Times venture focused on analytical coverage of opinion polls, economic indicators, politics, policy, education, and sports. The new site will be overseen by David Leonhart, who will move from his current position as Washington D.C. bureau chief. In addition to Wolfers, the site has hired Amanda Cox, who will anchor the graphics coverage, Michael Beschloss, a historian who will serve as a contributing columnist, and Nate Cohn, who will join as a correspondent from The New Republic.

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Gerber co-writes op-ed on potential for investment crowdfunding in Michigan

Friday, November 22, 2013

In a Detroit Free Press opinion article, Elisabeth Gerber writes that pending legislation that would allow nonaccredited investors to purchase shares of Michigan companies could provide a great tool to help small businesses raise capital and spur local economic development. The op-ed was co-written with Daniel Gilmartin, executive director and CEO of the Michigan Municipal League, and Chris Miller, downtown development authority and economic development coordinator for the city of Adrian, Michigan.

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Levitsky interviewed on implications of relaxed marijuana restrictions

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

On an episode of Michigan Radio's Stateside program, Melvyn Levitsky discusses the history of relaxed marijuana restrictions, as well as the federal and global implications of this trend. Levitsky, who has served as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters and on the International Narcotics Control Board, argues that the federal government's failure to challenge changes in marijuana laws at the state level means the United States is ignoring its constitutional and international obligations.

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Whitman speculates about the priorities of a political party appealing to moderates

Thursday, November 14, 2013

In Detroit Free Press op-ed , Marina v. N. Whitman asks "what would a political party that appeals to moderates look like?" Whitman writes that a party representing the moderate majority would stand for fiscal responsibility and social inclusiveness and restore the language and behavior of bipartisanship.

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Rabe discusses state's low recycling rate on Michigan Radio

Thursday, November 14, 2013

With a recycling rate of less than 20 percent, Michigan falls far below both the regional and national average. In an interview on Michigan Radio's Stateside program, Barry Rabe discusses why Michigan has such a low recycling rate and what policies can be put in place to incentivize behavioral change.

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Catfish inspection program could impact ability for U.S. to get trade concessions, says Ciorciari

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

John Ciorciari was quoted in a New York Times article on the potential for a pending catfish inspection program to complicate a major trade agreement between the U.S. and 11 Pacific nations, known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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Davis quoted in New York Times article on effects of warning labels on children's medicines

Monday, November 11, 2013

A new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that reforms made surrounding children's cough and cold medicines, including labels which warning that they should not be given to children younger than 4, have had a strong positive effect. Since 2007 when the labels were enacted, there has been a significant decrease in emergency hospital visits by toddlers and infants with suspected medical problems after using these medicines. In a New York Times article on the labels, Dr. Matthew Davis comments that the curb in misuse of cough and cold medicines for children under 4 is the first part of positive story but that there is more progress to be made.

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Danziger pens Huffington Post op-ed on persistent effects of the Great Recession

Thursday, November 7, 2013

In a Huffington Post opinion article, "Ravages of the Great Recession," Sheldon Danziger writes that Congress's dysfunction, in particular its preoccupation with slashing the federal deficit, is prolonging economic pains. Danziger cites a new study in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science which finds that, for many Americans, the impact of the recession will last through their working lives and into retirement.

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