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Davis quoted on health impacts and growing appeal of e-cigarettes

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

In a story for Michigan Radio, Dr. Matthew Davis explains that no studies have been done on the long-term health impacts of e-cigarettes, which are unregulated and increasingly popular with teens.

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The Real Problem with Citizens United: Campaign Finance, Dark Money, and Shadow Parties

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Few cases have generated as much controversy as Citizens United. The story told by reformers and reporters is that Citizens United ushered in a new era of dark money, with wealthy corporations spending wildly, saturating the airwaves, and taking over American politics. Most of that story is wrong, and some of it is nonsense. There is a bigger story about the relationship between Citizens United and American politics; it's just not the one we've been told.

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States and localities need to work together to tap the potential of shale deposits, writes Rabe

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

In a blog post for the Brookings Institution, Barry Rabe and Christopher Borick, a professor of political science at Muhlenberg College, explain how a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision highlights the state and local governance challenges facing regions with accessible shale deposits. The Court voted to sustain a lower court decision to overturn key provisions in 2012 legislation that put fracking largely under state control. The case was brought by a series of local governments.

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Alumni Board Members Elected to Serve January 1, 2014-December 31, 2016

Friday, December 20, 2013

This past fall, Ford School alumni elected six of their peers to serve on the Alumni Board. Those elected to serve from January 1, 2014 through December 31, 2016 are Peter Fritz (MPP/MBA '10), Keith Fudge (MPP '09), Tres Fuller (BA '10), Catherine Lomax (MPP '01), Jomo Thorne (MPP/MBA '08), and Paul Weech (MPP '81).

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Legacies of the war on poverty, lessons for the future

Friday, December 20, 2013

January 8, 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson's declaration of "unconditional War on Poverty." Yet 15 percent of Americans live in poverty today, and no presidential administration or Congress since the Johnson era has made fighting poverty a top priority.

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Collins says Carmen Iezzi Mezzera will be a "strong advocate for international affairs education" as APSIA executive director

Thursday, December 19, 2013

The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) announced the appointment of Carmen Iezzi Mezzera as its new executive director after a search led by Dean Susan M. Collins, current APSIA president.

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MPPS Report: One year after right-to-work legislation was enacted, local leaders have mixed views on the law change

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

A new survey conducted by the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy found that many local government leaders do not see right-to-work as a game-changer for their jurisdictions.

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Catalysts for change-themed Fall edition of State & Hill published

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

On critically important policy issues, members of the Ford School community have catalyzed real and lasting change—enriching understanding, building consensus, and mobilizing action. This edition of State & Hill features stories about the extended reach and impact of faculty, alumni and friends of the Ford School.

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A powerful public service

Monday, December 16, 2013

Scholarly CVs are long, there's no denying it, so it's not surprising that Paul N. Courant's CV stretches a good twelve feet from end to end. What is surprising is that what is likely to be Courant's single greatest contribution to scholarship isn't mentioned in his CV at all: development of the largest digital library in the world, the HathiTrust.

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BA alum among 'Top 35 under 35' foreigners making an impact in Africa

Monday, December 16, 2013

Madelynne Wager (BA '13), a first generation college student from the small town of Greenville, Mich., knew she wanted to make an impact. When she started her studies at the University of Michigan, she thought she could do that best by becoming a doctor. But during a summer medical internship in Venezuela, Wager became deeply troubled by the health disparities she witnessed between the wealthy patients at the region's spotless, upscale hospital, and what the poor confronted at the area's crowded, unkempt clinic. Why are poor people getting so much sicker in the first place, she wondered, and if poverty makes you vulnerable, can a living wage improve your health?

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Rare and powerful analysis

Monday, December 16, 2013

Latesha Love (MPP '02) was two weeks into her second year of graduate school in Ann Arbor, getting dressed for class and watching the news with an absent-minded interest, when she realized that "something was really, really, really wrong." It was the morning of September 11, and Love, like everyone else in America, quickly became riveted by the events unfolding on her television.

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Matching and mobilizing private investments in conservation

Monday, December 16, 2013

Jason Weller (MPP '99) was just out of college, with a still-crisp undergraduate degree, when the native northern-Californian took an unlikely summer job on a family ranching operation in Big Timber, Montana. He was expecting a "Brad Pitt, Legends of the Fall experience," he recalls with self-deprecating humor; instead, he wound up working harder than he'd ever worked in his life. He fixed the fences, shoveled the manure, stacked the hay, and dodged the bulls and rattlesnakes; but his most important responsibility was irrigation.

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Not your typical physician - Dr. Matt Davis uses policy to tackle health disparities

Monday, December 16, 2013

Dr. Matthew Davis is not your typical physician. Sure, he attended medical school and completed a residency, just like his peers. But while continuing his studies as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Chicago, Davis also earned a master's degree in public policy. Davis still sees and serves primary care patients through his practice with the University of Michigan Health System, but his public policy training, and what he's done with it over the years, is allowing him to serve the health needs of much larger communities, in much broader ways. These days, he's doing that as chief medical executive for the state of Michigan—a role he took on in March of this year.

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From dreaming to doing - tuition equality now

Monday, December 16, 2013

On April 17, 2013, at approximately 6:00 p.m., 50-60 people gathered outside the Michigan Union, at the intersection of State Street and South University. U-M student activists and Ann Arbor community members had come to protest the University's in-state tuition policy, which at that time excluded undocumented Michigan high school graduates. By 7:00 p.m., the protesters had blocked the intersection. "What do we want?" they chanted, in a classic protest call and response. "Tuition equality! When do we want it? Now!" Eight were arrested, including Ford School alumna Marisol Ramos (MPP/MA '13) who, despite her youth, has been an immigrant rights activist and organizer for nearly a decade.

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Yes, you! - The unlikely and absolutely inspiring career of Eunice Burns

Monday, December 16, 2013

Eunice Burns (MPA '70) holds up a photograph taken at her 90th birthday celebration. It's of her children—Catherine's the oldest; then there's Laurie, Robert, and Tamara. In the picture Burns beams with pride, as she does now. Over the years, Burns' children have organized small tributes on her birthday to honor her lifetime of dedication to the city of Ann Arbor; on a number of occasions she has received proclamations from the mayor.

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The People's House - Gerald Ford's congressional legacy

Monday, December 16, 2013

Before Nixon's fall, before Agnew's fall, Gerald R. Ford spent 25 years in the U.S. House of Representatives. But while everyone remembers his presidency, and the "extraordinary circumstances" under which he assumed the post, too few recall the influential role he played as a moderate Republican in Congress.

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Sausage-making for charity - Student-led auction wins Forever Go Blue award

Monday, December 16, 2013

Want to learn to curse in Bulgarian? Experience mixing, grinding, and stuffing your own sausages before you launch your career in DC? Challenge your school's dean to a game of Whirly Ball? Enjoy a momofuku-style Bo Ssam dinner with six of your closest friends? Just attend the Ford School's annual Charity Auction.

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Ford School 100: centennial stories

Monday, December 16, 2013

The launch of the Institute of Public Administration (IPA) in 1946 was a turning point for the school now known as the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. Originally established in 1914 to prepare graduates for careers in municipal government, the IPA was designed to prepare graduates for careers at the state level, and to serve the rising demand for well-trained public administrators—a demand brought on by the close of WWII and the growth of American cities.

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Our next century

Monday, December 16, 2013

As the University launches a major fundraising initiative, "Victors for Michigan," State & Hill speaks with the co-chairs of the Ford School's campaign, Jim Hudak (MPP '71) and Jim Hackett (BGS '77).

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Crowdfunding guides prepared by Ford School students circulated by Crowdfund Insider

Saturday, December 14, 2013

Documents prepared by Christopher Falcone (MPP '14), Matthew Papadapoluos (MPP/MA '13), Erin Sullivan (MPP '14), and Jessica Teng (MPP '14) detailing the basics of equity crowdfunding and a framework for potential investors and businesses to consider circulated after crowdfunding legislation is passed in the Michigan Senate.

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