In the News

In the News | Ford School News | Faculty News | Student News | Alumni News

81–100 of 1381

« Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 769 70 Next »

Sue Dynarski's research discussed in congressional hearing with Education Secretary Arne Duncan

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Ford School Professor Susan Dynarski's research on student loan default rates was cited by Representative Tom Petri while Secretary Duncan was testifying to the House Education and the Workforce Committee on Department of Education goals for 2014.

[More]


Skin in the game

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Applied Policy Seminar puts students to work for local governments, NGOs

By Jeff Mortimer

When Susan Pollay, executive director of the Ann Arbor Downtown Development Authority (DDA), wanted to document the economic impact of her organization and others like it around the state of Michigan last fall, she sought help from the Ford School.

[More]


Historical timeline celebrates centennial, more detailed online version in the works

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The spring 2014 edition of State & Hill magazine features a ten-page, photo-rich historical timeline highlighting the history of America's first graduate-level training program in public administration. The Ford School is now preparing a longer, web-based version for launch this fall, and seeks input and suggestions from Ford School students, faculty, alumni, and friends.

[More]


Bloomberg features Yu Xie's research, reporting Chinese income inequality surpasses that of the U.S.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

"The income gap between the rich and poor in China has surpassed that of the U.S. and is among the widest in the world," write Lorraine Woellert and Sharon Chen, reporters for Bloomberg, in the April 29 article, "China's Income Inequality Surpasses U.S., Posing Risk for Xi."

[More]


Bachelor's of public policy student off to serve Google Dubai

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

As Zouheir Al Ghreiwati prepares to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree in public policy from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, he pinpoints what drew him to Michigan. There were two things, really: being able to switch majors and the tsunami of team spirit.

[More]


Undergraduate class uses $55,000 grant to study the art and impact of philanthropy

Monday, April 28, 2014

Students in Public Policy 475: "Philanthropic Foundations in the Public Arena" spent the semester getting a taste of what it means to be a philanthropist in a nonprofit organization. Taught by Lecturer Megan Tompkins-Stange, the class used a $55,000 grant from the Once Upon a Time Foundation to support a semester-long project, in which students collaborated to determine which nonprofit organizations to support, how to allocate and award the funding, and how to evaluate the impact of the gifts.

[More]


Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy 2014 Commencement

Thursday, April 24, 2014

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. The Charge to the Class will be delivered by U.S. Senator Carl Levin (D-MI).

[More]


Matthew Davis discusses short- and long-term benefits of investments in lead abatement

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Ford School Professor Matthew Davis, who serves as chief medical executive for the State of Michigan, joined Michigan Radio on April 23 to discuss the continuing public health threat that lead poising poses to children in Michigan, and especially Detroit, where lead paint remains prevalent. Scientists have shown that lead poising is connected to diminishing intelligence, behavior problems, and even an increase in the likelihood of serving time in prison.

[More]


Isaac McFarlin discusses his research on Texas Top 10 Percent Plan with NPR

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Isaac McFarlin, assistant research scientist at the Ford School, discussed his research on the Texas Top 10 Percent Plan with NPR's Dallas affiliate on April 22. The Texas plan is simple: if you graduate in the top 10 percent of your high school class in Texas, you're guaranteed a spot in one of the state's flagship universities—the University of Texas or Texas A&M. McFarlin's research, however, demonstrates that the plan impacts students differently, based on their high school.

[More]


Collins Vereen family kick-starts new funds with $25,000 gift

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

New endowed funds for student support

The Ford School has created two new permanent endowment funds to help commemorate the Ford School's Centennial; 100 years of public policy at UM. These funds give alumni and friends the chance to contribute endowed student financial aid and shape the next century of the school.

[More]


Wolfers to contribute to New York Times politics and policy website The Upshot

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Professor of Public Policy Justin Wolfers will be a regular contributor to the New York Times venture The Upshot, which launched on April 22. Per the New York Times release, "the goal of [The Upshot] is to help readers better navigate the news using data, graphics and technology."

[More]


Collaborative research effort shows pollution top concern for citizens around Great Lakes

Monday, April 21, 2014

The Ford School joined a research team including faculty and graduate students from Ryerson University in Toronto and Muhlenberg College in Pennsylvania to survey public opinion on issues related to the Great Lakes basin.

[More]


Ford School's Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy hosts Ann Arbor mayoral candidates

Friday, April 18, 2014

The Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP) hosted the four declared candidates in Ann Arbor's mayoral race on Wednesday, April 16. The forum focused on the future of public transportation and prospects for economic development of Ann Arbor's downtown. Mayor John Hieftje, who is stepping down after 14 years in office and is a longtime lecturer at the Ford School, moderated the event.

[More]


Inaugural Dow Sustainability Fellow Cassie Brown helps city establish revolving loan fund for A2 energy efficiency upgrades

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

The first cohort of Dow Sustainability Fellows has recently partnered with the City of Ann Arbor on a pilot project establishing a new, low-interest revolving loan fund for landlords and renters seeking to improve the energy efficiency of rental properties. Cassie Brown, who is seeking a dual degree in engineering and public policy and a Science, Technology, and Public Policy certificate, is among the Dow Sustainability Fellows engaged in the project. Others include Alicia Chin and Amy Eischen from the Ross School of Business, Efrie Friedlander from the Taubman College of Art and Architecture, and Emily Taylor, who is affiliated with the Erb Institute, the School of Natural Resources, and the Ross School of Business.

[More]


CLOSUP illuminates local leaders' perceptions of tax-exempt properties

Thursday, April 10, 2014

"It's no overstatement to say that property tax revenues are really the lifeblood of local government. So what do local leaders think about the tax-exempt properties within their borders—the ones that take up municipal services, but are exempt from paying taxes?" asks Cynthia Canty of "Stateside," the Michigan Radio program, during a recent interview with Tom Ivacko (MPA '93), administrator and program manager of CLOSUP.

[More]


Khmer Rouge Trials: Serving to End or Compound Cambodia's Culture of Impunity?

Thursday, April 10, 2014

In a conversation moderated by Susan Waltz, Margo Picken and John Ciorciari will discuss the positive and negative effects of the UN-backed Khmer Rouge trials that began several years ago in "extraordinary chambers" of the courts of Cambodia. Will they bring "closure" to the country's dark past? What impact have they had on the situation of human rights in Cambodia today?

[More]


Waltz argues Universal Declaration of Human Rights a global, cooperative effort; not just a western idea

Thursday, April 10, 2014

On April 9th, Professor of Public Policy Susan E. Waltz, a scholar and long-time leader in the field of human rights, describes "How Human Rights Went Global" in openSecurity. Waltz says the Universal Declaration of Human Rights isn't a document of western values imposed on the world, an argument used by many human rights abusers to discard the letter and intent of the Declaration. Rather, it "emerged from the wisdom of the post-war international crowd," a true reflection of international beliefs codified in international law.

[More]


Ford School celebrates the legacy of Margaret Ann (Ranny) Riecker (HLLD '05)

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Margaret Ann (Ranny) Riecker (HLLD '05), who passed away in Midland, Mich., on April 7, was among the Ford School's most generous volunteers and supporters. Her philanthropy through the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation (where she was president), the Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation (where she was chair), and personal giving with her late husband John Riecker (AB '52, JD '54), has been instrumental in the Ford School's advancement over the years.

[More]


Public less supportive of state fossil fuel taxes, says CLOSUP, still strong for renewable electricity

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

CLOSUP's March report from the National Surveys on Energy and the Environment reveals declining support for state fossil fuel taxes levied to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

[More]


Students and staff run Big House 5K for fun and charity

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Ford School students and staff ran in the second annual Big House 5K: Trail to the Victors on Sunday, April 6. The event, coordinated by the U-M Athletic Department and Ann Arbor Track Club, began at the Glick Field House, circled through campus, and ended on the 50-yard-line of the Big House.

[More]


81–100 of 1381

« Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 769 70 Next »


News RSS