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John Ciorciari quoted in AFP News article, "Taiwan-China ties could falter after poll: experts"

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Assistant Professor of Public Policy John Ciorciari was quoted Wednesday by AFP News on the potential impact of Saturday's Taiwanese presidential elections on relations between Taiwan and China.

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Joe Schwarz spoke to Battle Creek Enquirer in article, "Cuts to military: 3,000 local jobs could hang in the balance"

Friday, January 6, 2012

Joe Schwarz spoke to the Battle Creek Enquirer about President Obama's announced cuts to national defense spending, and its impact on both southwest Michigan and the rest of the country.

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State & Hill's Winter 2012 issue explores education reform, policy, evaluation, and more

Thursday, January 5, 2012

State & Hill's Winter 2012 issue offers readers an opportunity to learn about the wide array of education reform and policy issues that our students, alumni, and faculty are tackling right now. Click through the magazine below to read about Susan M. Dynarski and Brian A. Jacob's research on charter schools, or how two alums size up No Child Left Behind ten years after its enactment, or how a first-year MPP student started a school in India. Other articles include a Q&A with philanthropist David Bohnett, an interview with four Ford School military veteran students, and a recap of the new Chinese policy course—replete with photos from a two-week trip to Beijing.

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America Unequal

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Distinguished University Professor Sheldon H. Danziger is one of the nation's foremost experts on poverty and inequality. He has led the National Poverty Center (NPC) since 2002.

S&H: Tell us about the NPC's Michigan Recession and Recovery Study.

SD: The project is designed to understand how workers, families, and children in southeast Michigan were affected by the Great Recession and the extent to which they are recovering from the economic shocks. Our research team has completed two waves of interviews with respondents from the Detroit metro area, with a third planned for spring 2013.

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Waiting for Superman: the sequel

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Whether we believe in charter schools or harbor our reservations, the fact remains that they're a vital part of our nation's education landscape. Today, some 5,000 charters across America enroll 1.6 million children, and those numbers are increasing steadily. With that kind of scale, it's critical to understand the effects of charters on the educational outcomes of the children they serve. Which charter school models produce the best outcomes for students? Which policies and programs do these highly effective charters employ?

Every day, news headlines across the nation highlight charter school controversies. Contentious laws in some states now permit 51 percent of parents in a low-performing public school to demand its conversion to a charter. Residents are up in arms about a newly proposed charter school, fearing it will draw students and funding away from the area's long-standing elementary. Charter schools are spending way more on administrative expenses than their traditional public counterparts and, on

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MPP student Pallavi Shukla builds a school in Lakhimpur, Uttar Pradesh

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Durga, the Hindu goddess of power, is often depicted mounted on a tiger, her eight arms loaded for bear with a trident, a sword, a thunderbolt, a spear.... Some say this powerful goddess was born of the gods' fury over an illiterate demon who was wreaking havoc on Earth. Pallavi Shukla's first student, was named Durga. Ironic, says Shukla, since Durga couldn't write the alphabet when they started. "She was a great student, and she picked up everything very quickly," Shukla explains, "but she'd had a spotty education and needed to get back on track."

Just out of college, 2011 Riecker Fellow Pallavi Shukla found a job in New Delhi developing patches for Microsoft. As an electronics and telecommunications engineer, the work was ideal. But it wasn't enough for Shukla, who loved working with people, and wanted to get out from behind a desk and do something. Education, she thought, had given her the tools she needed to move to a big city and make a lot of money, bu

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PPIA: 30 Years of Preparing Leaders

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Bright, energetic, and compassionate, Tosha Downey—one of more than 4,000 graduates of the national Public Policy and International Affairs program—is deeply engaged in Chicago's south side renaissance, and in dramatically improving educational opportunities for children in some of the city's most challenged urban communities.

When I reach Tosha Downey (MPP '96) on her cell phone, she's navigating Chicago's south side to pick up a former student for a group intervention.

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From the Great Hall to the Great Wall

Thursday, January 5, 2012

New course takes students and faculty to China to study contemporary policy

Ford School Assistant Professor Philip Potter developed a new course last spring that introduced MPP students to contemporary Chinese public policy in a rather interactive way—by going to China.

"China is a crucially important country, and we have many students who are interested in its politics, so it was an obvious choice for this program," said Potter, who has done research on China, including current work on whether the country's increased domestic liberalization and international power will make it more of a target for terrorist organizations.

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To the city and the world

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Los Angeles-based David Bohnett is the founder and managing member of the early stage technology fund, Baroda Ventures. In 1994, he founded GeoCities.com, one of the original Internet success stories. He is chairman of the board of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association and a trustee of amfAR, The American Foundation for AIDS Research, and of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The David Bohnett Foundation funds a wide variety of innovative programs in major cities across the U.S. At the Ford School, the Foundation supports a prestigious, competitive fellowship that provides two years of tuition support and a paid summer internship in the City of Detroit's mayor's office.

The Bohnett Fellowship provides well-trained interns to mayoral offices in several cities and fosters a commitment among policy graduates to work in cities. Why are urban policy issues important?

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Public Service In The City

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Bohnett Fellows learn to devise policy inside Detroit mayor's office

Elizabeth Palazzola and Julie Schneider knew Detroit pretty well even before last summer. Then they learned a whole new side of it—the inside—as members of Mayor Dave Bing's administration.

"I've worked in Detroit in various capacities--with nonprofits, city agencies, state agencies, with the public on events and environmental issues-—but what was really missing was the mayor's office," said Palazzola, who spent three years as a research assistant at Wayne State University's Center for Urban Studies.

"That was what I was most excited about, filling in that blank. I think now having done so I have an even greater appreciation for the city."

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Joint PhD Program Reaches Ten Year Mark

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Founding director Mary E. Corcoran and others reflect on the program's success

When Mary E. Corcoran became program director of the Ford School's fledgling joint doctoral program 10 years ago, she didn't have a problem recruiting students.

They already were coming to her.

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Ten Years After No Child Left Behind

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Two alums reflect on school accountability

President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced a new waiver system in September, the latest attempt to alleviate the burden felt by the 20 percent of schools labeled "failing" under No Child Left Behind, the largest education reform of the decade.

First passed in 2001, NCLB is changing how our nation thinks about school accountability. It's also forcing us to reconsider "how we measure what it means to be a good school," says 2002 Frey Foundation Fellow Alexa Shore (MPP '04), deputy director for the Office of Accountability at the New York City Department of Education.

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On the front lines

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Teach for America a destination for service-minded Ford School undergraduates

Elam Lantz entered the Ford School with an eye on the biggest of policymaking stages, Washington, DC. But he soon reassessed his approach to making the world a better place. "I realized I needed to be on the front lines, in the trenches, for a few years," said Lantz (BA '10). "I needed to be able to affect change on a smaller level before I would feel comfortable or confident doing it on a bigger level."

Lantz decided to make an immediate impact with Teach For America (TFA), which trains recent college graduates of all disciplines to teach in low-income rural and urban school districts. He's now in his second year working with special-needs students at an elementary school in the Bronx. According to the organization's website, more than 9,300 TFA corps members will teach 600,000 students during the 2011-12 school year.

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David K. Cohen, Susan M. Dynarski, and Brian A. Jacob cited in Education Week's 2012 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Presence Rankings

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Three Ford School faculty members—David K. Cohen, Susan M. Dynarski, and Brian A. Jacob—were named to Education Week blogger Rick Hess' 2012 rankings of education scholars. The 2012 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Presence Rankings recognize the top academic contributors to public discussion about schools and schooling. The scores are based on researchers' 2011 footprint as measured by the number of books and articles written and cited within the year, as well as press, blog, and newspaper mentions.

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Associate Dean Alan Deardorff to lead International Policy Center on interim basis

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

The Ford School's International Policy Center has a new interim leader, as Associate Dean Alan Deardorff has agreed to serve as Interim Director.

Founding IPC director Jan Svejnar will leave the University of Michigan to join the faculty of Columbia University as director of the newly-established Center for Global Economic Governance. Jan founded the International Policy Center here at the Ford School in 2005, with input and support provided along the way by a number of University of Michigan faculty. The Ford School is grateful to Jan for his hard work, vision, and leadership.

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Scott Atran interviewed by CNN in article, "North Koreans grief-stricken over Kim's death"

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Scott Atran spoke to CNN about the intense North Korean reactions to the death of Kim Jong-il.

Upon hearing the news of Kim Jong-il's death many North Koreans began hysterically sobbing and bawling, and television crews captured people so grief-stricken they could barely speak. As the article's author explains, this outpouring of emotion is so intense that many question its sincerity.

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Tom Ivacko quoted in Bridge magazine article, "Merger bills won't change names on fire trucks—yet"

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

In light of six new Michigan merger bills, Tom Ivacko spoke to Bridge magazine about cost sharing findings from the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy's Michigan Public Policy Survey (MPPS).

These new bills, signed by Governor Rick Snyder on Dec. 14, were designed to remove real or perceived roadblocks that might have prevented local governments from consolidating services—such as employee salary provisions.

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Military Minds

Monday, December 19, 2011

John Stanczak, who is still active in the U.S. Army, served in Iraq for 15 months. He will be serving with the 1st Armored Division at Ft. Bliss in El Paso, Texas, following graduation.

Ingrid Schuster Tighe is a former Army communications officer with leadership experience during wartime in Baghdad, Iraq, and peace-keeping missions in Macedonia and Kosovo. After her military service, Ingrid worked in commercial real estate and founded her own leadership consulting business.

2011 Bromage Intern George Stankow spent 13 years in uniform as an active and reserve U.S. Army officer, including tours in Korea, Germany, Kosovo, Egypt, and Iraq. He also spent two years in Iraq as a civilian contractor.

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Alan Deardorff speaks with National Public Radio about China's increased tariffs on U.S. vehicles

Friday, December 16, 2011

Reacting to China's announcement that it will increase tariffs on large American-made cars and SUVs, Alan Deardorff told Michigan Radio that the World Trade Organization could make such disputes less frequent in the future.

"These things working their way through the system I think is much better than working outside the system, which is what used to happen before we had the WTO," Deardoff said.

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