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"Ned was right" conference at the Fed

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Over three decades of service, Founding Dean Ned Gramlich helped shape the Ford School's mission and vision, and served as an exemplar of what it means to be a world-class policy professor. He conducted extensive and widely-respected research, both theoretical and applied, and shared his findings broadly in books, scholarly journal articles, policy briefs, and frequent interactions with policy leaders. He served in alternating, and sometimes simultaneous, leadership positions in government and academia, including as a governor of the Federal Reserve Board and acting director of the Congressional Budget Office. And, wherever he went, whatever he did, he demonstrated thoughtfulness, humor, and camaraderie as a teacher, mentor, and colleague.

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Symposium honors Jim House; 35 years of teaching, service

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

After an academic career spanning eight years at Duke University and some 35 years at the University of Michigan, Professor James S. House will retire this August. To celebrate his career, former students and postdocs participated in a day-long symposium at the Michigan League on June 2, sharing their research and emphasizing how their own intellectual agendas and accomplishments had been impacted by Jim's scholarship and mentorship.

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Students explore windy city careers

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

For years, the Ford School has hosted an annual student trip to Washington, DC, where Ford School students can learn more about careers in our nation's capital. This year, we added something new to the mix—a student trip to Chicago.

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Meet our 2014 PPIA Fellows

Monday, June 9, 2014

An anthropology major from Ghana; a liberal arts major from Jamaica; an international studies major from Livonia; a business administration major from Los Angeles; an economics major from West Virginia; a sociology major from Santa Ana; a political science major from Mexico; the list goes on. Altogether, 18 undergraduate students have been selected for the Ford School's Public Policy and International Affairs Junior Summer Institute, an intensive summer training program for aspiring public servants.

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College credit for high school courses?

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

A $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES) will allow Ford School faculty and colleagues at partner institutions to launch a five-year study on the impact of a new Tennessee policy that allows students to earn college credits for advanced math courses taken in high school.

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Internship field report: Nick Pfost @ EqualityMaine

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Second year MPPer Nick Pfost shares news from Portland, Maine, where he's serving as legislative and public policy graduate intern at EqualityMaine. In his guest blog post for EqualityMaine, Pfost describes himself as "the nerdy high school student who watched CSPAN after classes while eating my macaroni and cheese." He'll spend the summer working on a variety of EqualityMaine legislative priorities, including LGBT-inclusive anti-bullying legislation.

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Rabe cited in Forbes on EPA greenhouse gas rules

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Ford School Professor Barry Rabe was cited in Howard Gleckman's June 2 Forbes article "Could EPA's New Greenhouse Gas Rule Open the Door to a New State-based Gas Tax?" "The proposed EPA rules, which Brookings senior fellow Barry Rabe describes as "climate federalism," seem to acknowledge the demise—at least for now—of a single federal solution to the climate problem," writes Gleckman.

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Major league fun for Ford School alums, students

Monday, June 2, 2014

Founding Ford School Dean Ned Gramlich was an avid baseball fan, and directed Major League Baseball's economic study commission in 1992, so we could think of no better way to cap our May 30 conference, "Honoring Ned Gramlich and the Importance of Policy Research," than to host a reception for DC-area alumni and students at Nationals Park.

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Celebrating Ned Gramlich: The Tribute Video

Monday, June 2, 2014

In 2007, the Urban Institute and Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy teamed up to create a video for Ned Gramlich, founding dean of our school and a senior fellow at the Urban Institute. Ned was battling a life-threatening illness, and the video was difficult to produce as Ned's friends and colleagues tried to remain positive for Ned's sake, while they fought back their own sadness. We are sharing this video publicly, in conjunction with the May 30 conference "Honoring Ned Gramlich and the Importance of Policy Research," sponsored by the Ford School and hosted at the Federal Reserve Board headquarters in Washington, DC.

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Whitman in Huff Po feature on crying at work

Friday, May 30, 2014

Marina v.N. Whitman is featured in Catherine Pearson's "What 15 Female Leaders Really Think about Crying at Work," published in the Huffington Post on May 28.

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Justin Wolfers featured in Aussie Financial Review

Thursday, May 29, 2014

"The path from gambling at a Sydney racetrack to sparring with the world's intellectual elite led Justin Wolfers to become one of Australia's more unorthodox and influential academic exports," writes Washington Correspondent John Kehoe in an extensive feature on Ford School Professor Justin Wolfers published in the May 30 issue of the Australian Financial Review Magazine.

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Michigan's hourly minimum wage to increase to $9.25

Thursday, May 29, 2014

In the May 28 Michigan Daily article, "Michigan law raises minimum wage to $9.25," Margo Levy, an undergraduate student at the University of Michigan, interviews Professors Sandra Danziger and Alan Deardorff on the pros and cons of the state's new minimum wage law.

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Introducing…the 2014 undergraduate student yearbook

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

To our knowledge, the Ford School has never prepared a yearbook for students and new graduates, but we decided this was a tradition worth breaking. Undergraduate students from the classes of 2014 and 2015 shared their photos and memories with us this spring, and we compiled them in an electronic yearbook that celebrates the energy and engagement of the Ford School's BA students and alumni.

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What fast food wage protesters can learn from the past

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

In a May 23 article for Business Insider, Hayley Peterson looks to history to argue "Why Today's Fast Food Wage Protests Won't Force Companies to Pony Up." "American workers have been unionizing and striking for better pay and working conditions since the mid-19th century," writes Peterson, who believes that today's fast food wage protests have little in common with successful labor movements of the past.

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Easing credit for parents seeking educational loans?

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

In a May 27 article for Bloomberg, Janet Lorin describes, "Alarm Raised by Plan to Ease Credit Norms on U.S. Parent Loans." The new plan to extend loans to a greater pool of parent applicants is drawing criticism from consumer advocates who say loosening the credit standards will "only hurt borrowers, and default rates, already on the rise, will continue to climb," writes Lorin.

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Barr argues for regulation of systemically important firms

Friday, May 23, 2014

Professor Michael S. Barr makes an appearance in "Financial Crisis, Over and Already Forgotten," a May 22 New York Times article by Floyd Norris. Norris writes that Barr is "working on a book titled, "Five Ways the Financial System Will Fail Next Time." The first way, Norris says of Barr's list, "'Amnesia, willful and otherwise,' regarding the causes and consequences of the crisis."

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Wolfers' research cited in NYT The Upshot column

Friday, May 23, 2014

"An indirect path to accuracy in election polling," a May 21 article by David Leonhardt for the New York Times' recently launched blog, The Upshot, cites work by Ford School Professor Justin Wolfers. Writing on Congressman Charles Rangel's reelection chances, Leonhardt (managing editor of The Upshot) uses Wolfers' research to argue that recent polls might show the primary challenge as closer than it actually is.

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Honoring Ned Gramlich and the Importance of Policy Research

Friday, May 23, 2014

On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Ford School (which of course had a different name 100 years ago), the Ford School and Federal Reserve Bank host "Honoring Ned Gramlich and the Importance of Policy Research," a conference that brings together leading practitioners of public policy analysis to illuminate current issues in the spirit of Ned's guiding principle: that good analysis is essential to making and implementing good policy.

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Hall characterizes minimum wage bill lobbying activity

Thursday, May 22, 2014

According to an analysis conducted by Bloomberg BNA, a division of Bloomberg, some 40 different groups spent money in the first three months of 2014 to lobby Congress on the minimum wage bill. Labor unions were for the bill; business groups were against it; but others, including religious groups, companies, and at least one major metropolitan area, also got involved. While the minimum wage bill stalled in April, it may return for a vote in the coming months.

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Kids and screen time, too much says Davis

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Young children in the U.S. get too much screen time is the chief finding of a new poll directed by Professor Matt Davis. More than one-quarter of parents with young children report that their kids get more than three hours of screen time per day, well above the National Institutes of Health guidelines. More than 10 percent of parents report no limits on screen time.

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