In the News

In the News | Ford School News | Faculty News | Student News | Alumni News

541–560 of 1289

« Previous 1 226 27 28 29 3064 65 Next »

Battle of the Super PACs: Campaign financing impacts American electoral politics

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Much of America is mesmerized by the recent and remarkable torrent of money flowing into the 2012 elections by organizations with buoyant names like Restore Our Future and Make Us Great Again. These contributions have dramatically overshadowed expenditures by the candidates and political parties that have traditionally run campaigns. It wasn't always so, explains Ford School Professor Richard L. Hall, who has written extensively on the influence of money in politics and policy.

Prior to the rise of Super PACs, Political Action Committees (PACs) "could contribute such small sums of money to candidates that it was hard to imagine these contributions had much of an impact at all," says Hall. "The better hypothesis was not that PAC contributions were buying something from members, but that they were signaling something to them."

[More]


Down to earth: Marina Whitman talks life and work in "The Martian's Daughter."

Thursday, April 26, 2012

In The Martian's Daughter: A Memoir, economist Marina Whitman talks candidly about her life, her work, and stepping outside of her famous father's shadow

In the fall of 1970, Marina von Neumann Whitman, unnerved by a tight deadline, burst into the office of Paul McCracken, then chairman of the president's Council of Economic Advisers (CEA). McCracken had invited the rising young economist to join his staff for a year—in a position that would set the stage for a series of increasingly prominent government appointments. Faced with a routine finance report and a conflicting personal obligation (her brother's wedding), Whitman sought reassurance from her mentor that she was up to the job—an unfounded insecurity that belied her professional achievement.

[More]


Gerrymandering, then and now

Thursday, April 26, 2012

It was the summer of 1971 when the first mandated round of redistricting was taking place across the nation. A series of Supreme Court decisions in the '60s had directed states to create new legislative districts every ten years to reflect population shifts revealed in decennial census counts. The goal was honorable enough: one person, one vote; but so little instruction was offered on how to accomplish the task that it practically invited abuse.

A group of faculty and graduate students led by Ford School instructor and U-M research professor Steve Pollock spent the summer experimenting. The challenge they addressed: could linear programming help craft districts with population equity and contiguity, as well as objective qualities like compactness or competitiveness?

[More]


Sharing Ford School lessons across the aisle

Thursday, April 26, 2012

When Anne Kaiser (MPP/MA '95) presents a bill on the floor of the Maryland House of Delegates, skeptical colleagues rarely catch her off-guard. She prides herself on knowing every question before she gets it—a practice she developed in Richard L. Hall's politics of policymaking class.

[More]


Internships shape recent BA student's career in campaigns

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Up by 6 a.m. scanning newspapers and listening to TV news anchors, Brian Wanglin's mornings haven't changed much from his days as an intern. And he couldn't be happier.

"I knew that after college I wanted to work on campaigns," said Wanglin (BA '11), now working for a Washington, DC consulting firm that specializes in campaigns. His responsibilities include media monitoring and rapid response, i.e., addressing critical media stories and opponents' attacks.

[More]


A different perspective

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Katharine D'Hondt (BA '12) wants to help you find a job. Not you, specifically, unless you've just graduated and have an interest in federal service. An intern in the U-M's Michigan in Washington Program (MIW) in fall 2011, D'Hondt's research paper examined the role economic forces may play in whether recent college graduates decide to enter the workforce or pursue graduate education.

"I was with the Partnership for Public Service (PPS), which is an NGO dealing with federal government hiring reform," D'Hondt explains. "I just love that I was able to help people my age understand what the federal government is doing and understand that there's a role for them there."

[More]


Starting over

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Japan has known earthquakes—the Great Kanto quake of 1923, the Great Hanshin quake of 1995, the Fukui quake of 1948, and hundreds of others—but Japan had never known an earthquake like the 9.0 Tohoku quake that struck just off the northeast coast last March. It was the fifth largest earthquake in recorded history, and the largest ever to hit the Land of the Rising Sun. The damage it left behind—mostly triggered by the massive tsunami that followed—was catastrophic.

The tremors shook southeastern Russia and the Northern Mariana Islands. Houses and buildings crumbled in Jayapura, Indonesia; Kailua Kona, Hawaii; and Pisco, Peru. A hemisphere away, vast portions of the Sulzberger Ice Shelf—two times the size of Manhattan—sheared into the sea. At the headquarters of the nonprofit Association for Aid and Relief (AAR) in Tokyo—230 miles from the epicenter—computers toppled and pictures crashed to the floor. But for Ford School master's of public policy student Yohei Chiba (MPP '12), the Tohoku earthquake hit home.

[More]


Staging a comeback

Thursday, April 26, 2012

"I believe Detroit is too big to fail. We must bail out Main Street, and so we need an all-hands-on-deck approach to help us turn the city around," said an impassioned community activist at a Detroit Financial Review Board meeting in March. The governor-appointed review board had just declared a financial state of emergency, while city and state officials played tug-o-war over a consent agreement that might—or might not—keep Detroit from bankruptcy.

Few would disagree that, even in economic distress, the city is worth saving. The question is how. If Detroit is to change its fate from casualty to comeback, what are some of the long-term policy solutions that might bolster revitalization?

[More]


Barry Rabe on Gerald Ford: The global president

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The University of Michigan invited Professor Barry Rabe to address the 89th Honors Convocation of the University, an event that celebrates and recognizes outstanding academic achievement by undergraduates. The theme of this year's Convocation: "Making a Difference in the World: Do We Need to Travel to Understand Global Affairs?" Rabe was named a Thurnau Professor in 2011 in recognition of his teaching excellence and commitment to enhancing undergraduate academic opportunities. Here is the speech he delivered to a crowd of 3,300 at Hill Auditorium on March 18, 2012.

Some 12 years ago, this marvelous auditorium was similarly packed. There was another celebration—and a bit of tension. Standing where I am today was Dr. Henry Kissinger. Then, as now, a controversial figure. One of the most influential 20th century Secretaries of State. As he began, so did heckling. A rather unflattering banner was unfurled from the balcony. (I can only hope that history does not repeat itself today.)

[More]


An unhealthy split

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The stress of a divorce can be tough on anyone, but a recent study by Ford School doctoral student Bridget Lavelle suggests the split presents a specific health challenge to women: staying insured.

Lavelle reviewed 11 years of U.S. Census Bureau data and discovered that women face a substantial risk of becoming uninsured following a divorce. Middle-class women previously covered through their ex-spouse's employer are most at risk.

[More]


Chamberlin: "It's everybody's job to keep city hall paying attention"

Monday, April 23, 2012

The city manager of Alexandria, Va., has instituted a new ethics initiative following a series of criminal charges against city workers in 2011, The Alexandria Times reported Monday. The eight incidents, which included charges of forgery, embezzlement, and drunk driving, led city manager Rashad Young to create an ethics committee of city employees, a whistleblower hotline, and mandatory training and retraining, among other reforms.

[More]


Danziger supports study's formula for gauging "the 1 percent"

Monday, April 23, 2012

Sheldon Danziger, director of the National Poverty Center and professor of public policy, was cited in a New York Times op-ed addressing the use of research in framing the public debate over income inequality in America.

A new study by economists Emmanuel Saez of the University of California, Berkeley and Thomas Piketty of the School of Economics in Paris looked at individuals' "market income"—total pre-tax income, not including any transfer payments from government, like unemployment or Social Security—to track the concentration of the nation's wealth.

[More]


AAAS selects five faculty members as fellows, including Elisabeth Gerber

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Five U-M faculty members have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a prestigious society that recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions in scholarly and professional fields.

[More]


Dynarski study finds women more likely to attend college than men

Saturday, April 14, 2012

Bloomberg News referenced a study co-authored by Susan M. Dynarski in an article that examines why more men have not pursued college degrees to boost their employment prospects.

Dynarski, an associate professor at the Ford School and School of Education, co-authored the December 2011 study, "Gains and Gaps: Changing Inequality in the U.S. College Entry and Completion," with Martha J. Bailey, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and research affiliate at the National Poverty Center.

[More]


Chamberlin: "I don't think ethics is the problem"

Thursday, April 12, 2012

The Center for Public Integrity (CPI) ranked Michigan's state ethics laws 43rd in a recent nationwide study. But John Chamberlin, professor of political science and public policy at the Ford School, did not sound too distressed in an interview with Bridge Magazine about Michigan's "F" grade.

[More]


Dynarski study finds women more likely to attend college than men

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Bloomberg News referenced a study co-authored by Susan M. Dynarski in an article that examines why more men have not pursued college degrees to boost their employment prospects.

Dynarski, an associate professor at the Ford School and School of Education, co-authored the December 2011 study, "Gains and Gaps: Changing Inequality in the U.S. College Entry and Completion," with Martha J. Bailey, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and research affiliate at the National Poverty Center.

[More]


Allan C. Stam to join Ford School faculty, direct International Policy Center

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

The Ford School is pleased to announce that the very distinguished Allan C. Stam has accepted its offer to join the faculty. Al is a professor of political science here at the U-M, and will move 50% of his appointment to the Ford School starting in fall 2012.

[More]


CLOSUP survey: State funding incentives foster collaboration but also raise concerns

Thursday, March 29, 2012

A new policy in Michigan that encourages local governments to collaborate and combine operations appears to be working, but it also carries a risk of producing unintended consequences, a new survey by the University of Michigan reports.

[More]


Hemelt honored with AEFP's Post-doctoral New Scholars Award

Monday, March 26, 2012

The Association for Education Finance and Policy (AEFP) has awarded postdoctoral research fellow Steven W. Hemelt with its Post-doctoral New Scholars Award. The award, which includes a $2,000 grant, will allow Hemelt to conduct research on the impact of elementary school interventions on postsecondary attendance and degree completion. Hemelt accepted the award at the AEFP's annual conference March 15-17 in Boston.

[More]


541–560 of 1289

« Previous 1 226 27 28 29 3064 65 Next »


News RSS