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Students flex policy muscles in Integrated Policy Exercise

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Now in its 13th consecutive year, the Integrated Policy Exercise (IPE) has become a signature activity of the Ford School master's program. For three days during the first week of January, MPP and MPA students role play stakeholders in a large-scale, intensive, and continually evolving simulation of a real policy issue. The exercise allows students to experience first-hand the complexity of policymaking, hone much-need skills, and interact with real policy experts.

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MPP/MPA applications due today, January 15

Friday, January 11, 2013

All application materials for the Master of Public Policy and Master of Public Administration program are due January 15. Applicants can view checklists and apply online.

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Cohen, Dynarski, and Jacob ranked among most influential academics in education debates

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Rick Hess of Education Week included David K. Cohen, Susan M. Dynarski, and Brian A. Jacob in a list of university-based academics who made the greatest contribution to national discussions around education in 2012. Of those listed in the ranking, Cohen and Dynarski were also placed among the top ten academics within their respective disciplines working on education, government/policy and economics respectively. The rankings are based on the overall public impact of academics on education debates as measured by published scholarship, commentary on developments in education, and public profile.

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An alum to watch: Naomi Goldberg (MPP '08)

Monday, January 7, 2013

A Chicago-based policy researcher for think tank Movement Advancement Project (MAP), Naomi splits her time between what she calls "movement" research—analyzing the capability of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) movement to create and effect change—and policy research that provides tools to advocates and organizations working toward LGBT equality.

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Time cites Kevin Stange study on outcomes of differential tuition

Thursday, January 3, 2013

As college tuition prices skyrocket and interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors remains stagnant, can lowering the price of tuition for more technical majors garner increased interest? That's the proposition currently being considered by Florida Governor Rick Scott's task force on higher education, according to an article at Time.com. The proposal includes freezing tuition costs in technical "strategic fields" while letting tuition rise in the humanities and other fields.

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Setting priorities: Kim Stone (MS '94, MPP '93)

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Kim Stone wants to make life in her community better. That's why she's chosen to run for public office.

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Helen Levy co-authors Detroit News op-ed on Medicaid expansion in Michigan

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

As lawmakers develop Michigan's budget for 2013, they would do well to consider expanding Medicaid coverage to those at or below 138 percent of poverty as called for by the Affordable Care Act, opine Ford School's Helen Levy and Thomas Buchmueller in the Detroit News.

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Housing market car production could be a big part of the recovery, says Wolfers

Saturday, December 29, 2012

The so-called fiscal cliff has dominated economic news lately, but economist Justin Wolfers spoke with Jacki Lyden of NPR's All Things Considered on non-cliff economic news stories of 2012. According to Wolfers, professor of economics and public policy at the Ford School, the economy has "already gone over the cliff," as consumer confidence and businesses' willingness to invest have likely waned as a result of congressional gridlock during the previous year.

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Washington Post quotes Betsey Stevenson on fiscal cliff deal

Tuesday, December 25, 2012

The Washington Post reports that it is unlikely that Democrats and Republicans will reach a deal an agreement on the looming fiscal cliff before Jan. 1. In what the article refers to as a "remarkable turnaround," Democrats want to make permanent the Bush-era tax cuts for middle Americans—the same cuts the party opposed more than a decade ago.

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New York Times cites education study by Dynarski, Bailey

Saturday, December 22, 2012

In an article on the difficulty low-income students have making it to college and graduating, the New York Times cited a 2011 study on educational inequality conducted by Susan Dynarski and Martha J. Bailey.

Dynarski, a professor in the Ford School and the School of Education co-authored the often-cited study with Martha J. Bailey, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and research affiliate at the National Poverty Center.

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Dynarski study shows growing gaps between rich and poor in postsecondary education

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Atlantic Magazine cites a 2011 study co-authored by Susan M. Dynarski on the widening gaps between low- and high-income students in college entry and graduation rates. The article examines why a college education, once understood to be the "great equalizer" allowing low-income students to catch up economically with their more affluent counterparts, no longer reliably offers such gains.

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Fall edition of State & Hill examines global and human security, Bob Axelrod's research on cooperation, the irrepressible First Lady Betty Ford, more

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

In this issue of the Ford School's magazine, State & Hill, readers will learn about global and human security through the eyes of the Ford School: faculty studying the 1994 Rwandan genocide, small arms, terrorist networks, and survivors of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia; students interning for Innovations in Poverty Action; and alums working for USAID. Click through the magazine below to read businessman, philanthropist, and Ford School friend Hank Meijer's discussion of the forthcoming Detroit Meijer store; a story on iconic First Lady Betty Ford and the U-M's fall tribute to her legacy; and how a BA alum who works for the Dept. of Justice is ensuring prisoner's rights.

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Stevenson, Wolfers examine why many top colleges may have a skewed view of their potential students

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

In their Bloomberg View column, Ford School economists Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers examine the findings of a recent study showing that high achievers from low-income families rarely apply to top colleges. "The real crisis in American education," they write, "is that our best colleges never see a large chunk of our smartest students."

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The ongoing Eurozone experiment

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

The fortunes of the European Economic and Monetary Union.

For many of us, the year 2006 was part of a different time. Our retirement accounts were increasing in value. Our house values were going up, up, up. Without much difficulty, we could borrow money to buy houses, make home improvements, or buy cars, boats, and refrigerators. Our spending was keeping the economy humming. For lots of us, the financial future looked bright.

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Changing the game: Bob Axelrod's powerful blueprint for peace

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

We've all heard the dictum, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth. It's an ancient Mesopotamian legal tradition recorded in Hammurabi's Code and in the holy texts of many religious faiths. The concept is simple: repay insult in kind—wound for wound, stripe for stripe, even life for life.

We've also heard the counterargument—an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind. But the two are far from mutually exclusive explains Robert Axelrod in his highly acclaimed book, The Evolution of Cooperation, which outlines a powerfully effective recipe for deescalating conflict.

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Memory and justice: Assembling archives of mass atrocities

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

A woman in Cambodia recently released more than 1,000 photographs of people imprisoned by the Khmer Rouge—the genocidal Democratic Kampuchea regime that ruled the country from 1975–79. She had worked in the regime's prison system and, fearing reprisal for her involvement, had hidden the photos. She gave the photos to the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-CAM), but for nearly thirty years, family members didn't know what had happened to their loved ones.

Now they know.

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Mapping terror: Understanding terrorist networks and alliances

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

People collaborate—it's what we do. We work together to tackle big problems. We work together to achieve big goals. We give favors, in hopes that they'll be reciprocated. We look out for each other, in hopes that someone else will look out for us in our moment of need. These collaborations make us stronger, smarter, safer, and more successful.

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Something worth fighting for: The future of an arms trade treaty

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

In July 2012, an eleventh hour phone call with instructions from the White House abruptly stalled passage of an all-but-complete 193-nation Arms Trade Treaty at the United Nations. Susan Waltz, professor of public policy, believes that was a mistake.

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Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA)

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

International development interns put ideas to work

One block down Hill Street, just west of State, is Ali Baba's, a small Middle Eastern restaurant with habit-forming grape leaves and baklava. Any day of the week, you're sure to find a table, or two, or five filled with folks from the Ford School. On just such a visit, I met Dionisio Garcia Piriz (MPP/MA '13), a dual degree master's student who had recently returned from a mind-bending summer internship exploring savings habits among indigenous Tsimané (chee-MAH-nay) tribes in the lowland forests of the Bolivian Amazon. Because most Tsimané rely on barter, the question of how they save for the future—how they build a cushion to support themselves if the plantains, rice, and sweet manioc crops fail—is an intriguing one. And Piriz's Tsimané study wasn't a one-off; it was part of a much larger study of non-traditional savings practices among tribes all over the developing world.

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A conversation with businessman, philanthropist, and Ford School friend, Hank Meijer

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Detroiters spend an estimated $4.6 billion each year on groceries and other merchandise. And more than $1.5 billion of those retail dollars are spent outside of the city.

That's about to change: in May 2012 Michigan-based retailer Meijer broke ground on the first of two planned locations. The first location will anchor the forthcoming Gateway Marketplace on the city's west side with a supercenter—a combination grocery and department store format employed by other retailers but originated by Meijer in 1962.

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